Horse Riding and Gullfoss, Geysir and Pingvellir

First of all, thank you so much, every one of you who has sent me comments on this site, e-mailed or called me to wish me good luck and safety, and to those who interested in  “following” a Woodswoman Walking.  While I typically write for myself, it is nice to know someone out there is reading . . . many someones, as a matter of fact.

So . . . I notice that as The Day approaches, I’m not just writing once a month anymore, though since I have been so busy getting ready, I hadn’t given a thought to what I might do on my eighteen-hour layover in Reykjavik, Iceland on Thursday.  As I tried to solve the first problem . . . where do I store this backpack (thank you, Cheryl Strayed) while I wander through Iceland’s capital? I stumbled on a sidebar to the left of the info about the bus transportation from the airport, which offers a plethora (one of my daughter’s favorite words) of day-tours, among other things.  And to my sheer delight, after agonizing over whether I want to see a geyser, a waterfall, or a National Park, I came upon an all-day combination, with a huge bonus . . . a two-hour horse ride.

Now, Jerri C and Janula, hold yourselves back, because I can hear you squealing all the way from New England.  Horse riding in Iceland!!!  I cannot wait.  And after that, on to the places with the exotic names appearing in the title of this write. Take a look.   http://www.re.is/DayTours/GeysirandGeothermal/Detail/Horse-riding-Gullfoss-Geysir-Thingvellir/

Doesn’t that language look like its parents were Welsh and Norwegian?  I’ll let you know more when I’m back on the airplane to Paris on Friday morning.  Me?  On a horse in Iceland?  Oh, how did I manage that?

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About Woodswoman

Writer, educator, psychotherapist, woodswoman. Crave solitude and just walked the Camino de Santiago from the French Pyrenees to Santiago de Compostela. Long-term partner, Neil. Three grown kids, one traveling the world for a couple of years (see theparallellife.com), and two in other countries . . . Thailand and Texas! One Golden Retrievers and two cats. Avid reader, looking for 10 more hours in each of my days.
This entry was posted in Camino de Santiago, Geysers, Horse riding in Iceland, national parks, Staying open, waterfalls and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to Horse Riding and Gullfoss, Geysir and Pingvellir

  1. You are incredible. I can’t wait to see what you do next. Safe travels, and may that backpack just keep feeling lighter and lighter.

  2. abivt says:

    My computer can’t open the fun horseback riding link… Have a blessed time! Remember, I’ll be praying for your safety, health and joy! Love from your heaven in VT!!! 🙂

  3. Donna Flood says:

    Congratulations!

    I just found your blog from a friend of mine, and I’m looking forward to your adventure. It’s something I’ve wanted to do and I’ll enjoy yours vicariously until I get the chance — though I’m likely to do my walking in the States.

    I just took a vacation in Iceland this spring, and you’ll love it. The water — just ordinary tap water — is amazingly tasty. Who knew?

    If you haven’t had the chance to brush up on Icelandic pronunciation, Thingvellir is actually pronounced something like THINK-fet-ler. (Icelandic accents the first syllable.) An NG is a K sound, and when a V follows that, it’s an F sounds. That sounds vaguely reasonable in English, but where the TL pronunciation for LL comes from is a mystery to me. And Geysir uses the soft S. Sounds just like “sir” on the end. By the way, Iceland is origin of the English word “geyser.” Also, if you can read Icelandic, you can read old Norse. The language hasn’t changed over the centuries, largely in part to the annual Althingi, where they kept in continual communication with each other, so no regional dialects developed.

    Thingvellir is where the first parliament (the Althingi) was ever held. It’s also where the tectonic plates are pulling the earth apart in the middle of lava fields, and has a gorgeous lake.

    Geysir is fun. Just don’t touch the water on the ground in the parking lot. That’s bubbled up from the ground, too, and it’s hot (don’t ask how I know….).

    Oh, dear. I’ll shut up now.

    Does it show that I loved Iceland?

    Have a wonderful trip, and thank you for sharing this!

    Donna

    ________________________________

  4. Debora Polk says:

    I so admire you for what you are doing and I have to admit a bit jealous. I would love to do something like this one day. I look forward to all you emails and updates and will live vicariously through your amazing adventure for now. Enjoy every moment and turn in the road!!! Den

    Sent from my iPhone

  5. janula2 says:

    I see you will be riding an Icelandic horse! They are small but feisty and you will have a fun adventure on one of those, I’m sure. Happy trails, my friend. ~~Janula

  6. Daryl Wisch says:

    as I write this you are on a horse in Iceland….oh how I wish I could be there with you….the horse is not on my list of things to do but Iceland certainly is….good luck daryl

  7. solowalking says:

    I am so excited to hear about your day in Iceland. Keep us updated and have a great time.
    Donna

  8. Rock says:

    leave it to you.

  9. Julie says:

    I am in awe of your courage and sense of adventure, and I am so glad I can vicariously live your experience in the safety and comfort of my own home! I will be keeping you in my prayers, and look forward to reading your blog posts!

  10. Phyllis says:

    Joannah we have never met but we have two things in common, your sister Rochelle (I went to college with her) and horseback riding in Iceland WHICH YOU WILL LOVE, You’ll just love Iceland generally, I’ve been there three times and it’s one of the most amazing places on earth. I’ll follow you trip with much interest!

  11. Dian Sparling says:

    Joannah, Go for the gusto…..starting in Iceland. Thanks for including me in the postings. With love and best wishes. Dian

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